I’m currently paying a moderate amount to atlassian to host jira for me, and I’m looking for a FOSS way to replace it. I don’t use it every month and I’ve decided it’s not worth continuing to pay, plus I want to transition to FOSS wherever I can. I just feel trapped. I’m sure people here know the feeling when using proprietary stuff.

I’ve used hosted bugzilla before, and possibly I didn’t know enough about how to make it work, but the web frontend they had was garbage, it was unintuitive and took forever to respond, and I just transitioned to jira because it was easier to use.

I’m happy to self-host for now and maybe pay for hosting if I want to collaborate in the future. I have a Ubuntu server at home with miles of headroom to run a webserver.

I would love to hear anyone’s opinions here. Also any other relevant lemmy subs would be very welcome.

Edit: some good questions about my requirements. I’m doing software development on personal projects using git, and I’m tracking issues using jira. I’m also developing hardware, which means 3d print files, CNC files and possibly gerbers for PCBs. All this can be tracked via git, so actually having an in-house way to host all that would be great too.

So I need an issue tracker that syncs with git, essentially.

I have also been using jira to kind of ad-hoc document any research involved in these things, but it’s not great because to find any of that documentation I need to dig into my closed issues. I’d like a documentation system that can handle diagrams, drawings and stuff like that, and if this could double as a general note-taking solution I’d love that too, because I’ve been trying to replace trello/onenote for that.

EDIT 2: Thanks for all the replies. I plan to investigate all the suggestions, my health has just been really bad since I posted this, but I always try to update anyone who offers help.

  • Rimu@piefed.social
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    23 days ago

    It depends what you were using Jira for - it has a lot of features, most of which you were probably not using.

    Trac has a wiki, tickets and git all in one - https://trac.edgewall.org

    NextCloud has a plugin called ‘Tasks’ which looks similar to Trello.

    Forgejo is similar to github - https://forgejo.org/

    • Excrubulent@slrpnk.netOP
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      23 days ago

      Oh good question. I’m using it for personal software development, tracking new features, bugs and documenting my research.

      I mostly use the kanban board view. I’ve wanted to add Confluence documentation pages but didn’t want to pay.

      I’ll also be developing hardware soon.

      • Rimu@piefed.social
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        19 days ago

        A solid choice. I’ve been using it daily ( codeberg.org ) for the last year and it’s pretty great!

        The code review features are not as awesome as github but you won’t need those.

    • Excrubulent@slrpnk.netOP
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      23 days ago

      Okay, I wasn’t able to review your links before so I just focussed on answering your question.

      Trac looks the most promising of everything I’ve seen so far, I like that it’s minimal and also does basically everything I’m looking for in one place. I’ll give it a try first.

      Thanks so much!

      • Rimu@piefed.social
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        23 days ago

        I don’t think trac has any kind of kanban UI to it, btw. They might have added it by now, it’s been years since I used it.

          • esaru@beehaw.org
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            23 days ago

            Trac was great years ago. As much as I know, they were stuck on Python 2 until the very last moment 3 years ago, so it became almost unusable, and the UI is not responsive even today, not usable on phone. It used to be really great, but be careful relying on it before doing research on its current development.